Learning Patterns – with Clean for Teams

One of my favorite Twitter feeds is from @LPatterns – I don’t know who is behind it, but it has the cutest images and the simplest little quips about learning, formulated in a set of patterns that they claim represent a ‘Pattern Language’.  I’ll share a few or their images here.

 

These represent ‘Jump In’ ‘Design Your Learning’, ‘Open Process’ and ‘Effective Questions’ patterns! There are many more!

 
Pattern Languages are near and dear to me – they are sets of practices that been put together to name interrelated themes and topics within a given domain – usually with a lovely metaphor for the pattern title.  I have a few books I love on Pattern Languages.  One of them is simply called ‘A Pattern Language’ – by Christopher Alexander – based on buildings, architecture, city planning and such.  This book inspired many in the software community to develop its own Pattern Languages.  There are books such as ‘Agile Adoption Patterns’, ‘Organizational Patterns of Agile Software Development’ and for developers: ‘Design Patterns – Elements of Reusable Object Oriented Software’.  I am sure I’ve missed a few – do leave me a note on any you can add to that.  There’s even a conference to help find new patterns called Pattern Languages for Programs (PLoP conference).
You might not realize that the small set of questions used in ‘Clean Language’ represents (in my mind, at least) another pattern language – in a slightly strange way.  There’s no content (no target audience like architecture, software or organizations) explicit here. The questions are applicable to any domain! For teams, the questions themselves allow us to ‘elicit’ patterns in ourselves (our behavior, thinking, learning and motivation – under the hood) and in others (collectively, or in individuals). The questions also have a few patterns within them – we have ‘developing’ questions, ‘sequence’ questions, ‘intention’ questions, and ‘location’ questions.  Knowing the uses of each set of questions is very useful indeed.

 

Back to learning –  learning is a way of survival. Everything in the world is changing quickly, and there’s much uncertainty. How does one stay on course when the skills of yesterday aren’t the skills of tomorrow? Are you aware of your own learning needs, and do you articulate the support you need to those around you? Do you know what environment you need to work at your best? Do you ask and get the support you need at work or home for your learning needs?

If you want to know your own patterns for learning and how to become an exquisite observer of patterns in others, I have two options.

  • Call or email me for a Clean Language session on ‘Learning At Your Best’ so I can help you discover your ‘learning at your best’ state!  (contact options below)
  • Register to join the training I’m running – called ‘Clean for Teams’  in April in Boston, MA with Caitlin Walker (link below)

Caitlin Walker has devised the simplest possible interventions to promote well being in team and group communication using Clean Language in a set of patterned practices. In learning them, you’ll start to recognize your own patterns and needs and you can take that back to your teams!  The various practices of ‘Clean for Teams’ fit together like a well made puzzle which you’ll come to experience in the training.  She’s tested them out in dozens of organizations over 20 years.

Here is some background info on Clean Language you can listen to on the way to work. All are audio, except as noted.

Caitlin’s Ted-X talk
From Contempt to Curiosity – Creating the Conditions for Groups to Collaborate (book)
Radio Interview #1
Radio Interview #2
Recorded webinar on Disruptive People In the Workplace
International Coaching Federation Interactive Keynote (youtube)

Podcast Interview of Antarctic Expedition Scientists using Clean Language to Cope in Stressful Situations

Then, if any of this speaks to you or your company’s needs, sign up for the training here.

As usual, email me at andrea@connections-at-work.com or phone me at +1 (571) 437-4815.
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Note to those going to #mobprogramming conference in Boston, the Clean for Teams training takes place immediately afterwards on April 16-17, 2018.  People who work day in and day out or very frequently in intense programming sessions could well make use of these same Clean Language tools for added cohesion and group development.

Explore posts in the same categories: Clean for Teams, Clean Language, Coaching, Conference, Systemic Modeling

5 Comments on “Learning Patterns – with Clean for Teams”

  1. Brian Dooley Says:

    Really great post Andrea. FYI, I’ve posted on linked in about curiosity, and if you wanted to comment about clean in Boston there, that might be a jumping in point for highlighting the training. I’ll do more, once you finalize the invite details.

    Later,

    Brian

    On Jan 30, 2018 7:57 AM, “Adaptive Collaboration” wrote:

    > Andrea Chiou posted: ” Design Your Learning – The Learning Patterns help > you improve your way of learning, and help you build a community. > pic.twitter.com/wjmlSDt9 — Learning Patterns (@LPatterns) January 29, > 2018 One of my favorite Twitter feeds is from @LPatterns – I don’t k” >

    Like


  2. Nice! I’d be very interested in any comments and suggestions for a Pattern Language I’ve been working on for “best practices” in teamwork, collaboration, coordination, and cooperation. https://petersironwood.wordpress.com/2018/01/07/special-spaces-wonderful-places/

    Like


  3. If anyone else got curious, as I did, about who’s behind those illustrations—I warn you, you won’t be able to leave your computer for a while.

    It’s Takashi Iba, and there’s a lot to dig into: http://web.sfc.keio.ac.jp/~iba/

    Like

    • Andrea Chiou Says:

      I just realized your reply is referring to the pictures posted by the Twitter handle called @LearningPatterns

      I wasn’t curious enough earlier to ask apparently! But I am so glad you shared this. What interesting research this person has been doing. I will definitely read more. Thank you Teddy!

      Liked by 1 person


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